Events

Our main events are listed below. Be sure to check our Facebook page and our regular events below for everything that is going on.

    Regular Events

    • Coffee & Chat

       Please note Coffee & Chat has been cancelled till further notice due to the coronavirus.

      Every Thursday 10 – 11am

    • Toddler Time

      Please note Toddler Time has been cancelled till further notice due to the coronavirus

      Every 2nd Wednesday 10-11am

      £1 per family

      Hello all
      Hope you are keeping safe. We very much look forward to seeing you all again. However, in the meantime be assured that you are all but only a thought away from us all
      Best wishes
      From all at Gardner Toddler Time

       

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    Our main events across the year are posted on the website, but there’s a lot going on – follow our Facebook page to keep up to date with everything that’s happening.

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    Sunday 21st February 2021
    Gardner Memorial & Farnell Parish Churches

    Lent is the period of 40 days which comes before Easter in the Christian calendar. Beginning on Ash Wednesday, Lent is a season of reflection and preparation before the celebrations of Easter. By observing the 40 days of Lent, Christians replicate Jesus Christ's sacrifice and withdrawal into the desert for 40 days. Lent is marked by fasting, both from food and festivities.

    Whereas Easter celebrates the resurrection of Jesus after his death on the cross, Lent recalls the events leading up to and including Jesus' crucifixion by Rome. This is believed to have taken place in Roman occupied Jerusalem.

    The Christian churches that observe Lent in the 21st century (and not all do significantly) use it as a time for prayer and penance. Only a small number of people today fast for the whole of Lent, although some maintain the practice on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday. It is more common these days for believers to surrender a particular vice such as favourite foods or smoking. Whatever the sacrifice it is a reflection of Jesus' deprivation in the wilderness and a test of self-discipline.

    Why 40 days?
    40 is a significant number in Jewish-Christian scripture:
    In Genesis, the flood which destroyed the earth was brought about by 40 days and nights of rain.
    The Hebrews spent 40 years in the wilderness before reaching the land promised to them by God.
    Moses fasted for 40 days before receiving the ten commandments on Mount Sinai.
    Jesus spent 40 days fasting in the wilderness in preparation for his ministry.
    Most Christians regard Jesus' time in the wilderness as the key event for the duration of Lent.

    Why is it called Lent?
    Lent is an old English word meaning 'lengthen'. Lent is observed in spring, when the days begin to get longer.

    The colour purple
    Purple is the symbolic colour used in some churches throughout Lent, for drapes and altar frontals. Purple is used for two reasons: firstly because it is associated with mourning and so anticipates the pain and suffering of the crucifixion, and secondly because purple is the colour associated with royalty, and celebrates Christ's resurrection and sovereignty.

    East and West
    Both the eastern and western churches observe Lent but they count the 40 days differently. The western church excludes Sundays (which is celebrated as the day of Christ's resurrection) whereas the eastern church includes them. The churches also start Lent on different days. Western churches start Lent on the 7th Wednesday before Easter Day (called Ash Wednesday). Eastern churches start Lent on the Monday of the 7th week before Easter and end it on the Friday 9 days before Easter. Eastern churches call this period the 'Great Lent'. The last week of Lent is called Holy Week.

    <>

    Matthew 4:1-11

    Then Jesus was led by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil. After fasting forty days and forty nights, he was hungry. The tempter came to him and said, “If you are the Son of God, tell these stones to become bread.”

    Jesus answered, “It is written: ‘Man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God.’”

    Then the devil took him to the holy city and had him stand on the highest point of the temple.

    “If you are the Son of God,” he said, “throw yourself down. For it is written: “‘He will command his angels concerning you, and they will lift you up in their hands, so that you will not strike your foot against a stone.’”

    Jesus answered him, “It is also written: ‘Do not put the Lord your God to the test.’”

    Again, the devil took him to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their splendour. “All this I will give you,” he said, “if you will bow down and worship me.”

    Jesus said to him, “Away from me, Satan! For it is written: ‘Worship the Lord your God, and serve him only.’”

    Then the devil left him, and angels came and attended him.

    <>

    Traditionally the view seems to have been that we give up “something” for Lent. Almost like the idea of a Dry January. However the purpose of giving up an activity was to allow more time for prayer and spiritual practice. I think that the words of Pope Francis point us in that direction urging us towards kindness, compassion, simplicity and so on. Similarly the “Love Yourself Through Lent Activities” not all of which are possible this year because of Covid restrictions but you could dance like nobody is watching, phone a friend and watch the clouds – oh and we could add Zoom Free Days [Malcolm]

    Thoughts from the Congregation about Lent
    • This period in the year prompts us to take the time to look at our lifestyle to reflect on our priorities, our desires, our addictions, our attitudes, our behaviour, our approach and to take the time to reflect on these actions. We then challenge ourselves to ask if we really need something, which we see as a necessity. We are greedy, we have a lack of thought for others and society in the world, we have so much – we have too much!
    • During this ”Lent” I have decided not to take so much for granted and pray for the healing and caring for “ Our World”, “Our Country”, all beauty and sounds around us that have been such a comfort in these strange times. I have so much to “Thank God” for.
    • Lent - For many years I struggled with Lent. I felt guilty as if I should be doing something because the Church told me it was a very important time in my relationship with God. I tended to ignore it. Now I am comfortable not doing anything different from my normal weekly activities with God. However, I would be glad to hear the thoughts of others as it may change my thinking.

    <>

    Prayer of St Francis

    Lord, make me an instrument of your peace.
    Where there is hatred, let me bring love.
    Where there is offence, let me bring pardon.
    Where there is discord, let me bring union.
    Where there is error, let me bring truth.
    Where there is doubt, let me bring faith.
    Where there is despair, let me bring hope.
    Where there is darkness, let me bring your light.
    Where there is sadness, let me bring joy.

    O Master, let me not seek as much
    to be consoled as to console,
    to be understood as to understand,
    to be loved as to love,
    for it is in giving that one receives,
    it is in self-forgetting that one finds,
    it is in pardoning that one is pardoned,
    it is in dying that one is raised to eternal life.
    Amen

    <>

    Notes:
    [1] Check this link for info re Brechin Community Led Tourism
    www.facebook.com/343486646842046/posts/343675253489852/?sfnsn=scwspwa.
    Should we be involved in this conversation? Any volunteers to represent Gardner and Farnell??

    [2] The Gardner Memorial Kirk Session will meet by Zoom on Monday 22nd Feb at 7.30pm

    [3] There will be a Zoom Meeting on Friday 26th Feb at 10.30am for a GM/F virtual coffee and chat. The link details will be circulated on Thursday

    <>

    May the road through life continue to rise to meet you
    May the wind be at your back
    May any rain that falls be soft and light.
    May you be held by the love of God
    In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
    Amen

    <>

    Malcolm

    E: malc.rooney@gmail.com office@gardnermemorialbrechin.org.uk
    M: 07909993233 01356 629191
    ... See MoreSee Less

    Sunday 21st February 2021
Gardner Memorial & Farnell Parish Churches 

Lent is the period of 40 days which comes before Easter in the Christian calendar. Beginning on Ash Wednesday, Lent is a season of reflection and preparation before the celebrations of Easter. By observing the 40 days of Lent, Christians replicate Jesus Christs sacrifice and withdrawal into the desert for 40 days. Lent is marked by fasting, both from food and festivities.
 
Whereas Easter celebrates the resurrection of Jesus after his death on the cross, Lent recalls the events leading up to and including Jesus crucifixion by Rome. This is believed to have taken place in Roman occupied Jerusalem.
 
The Christian churches that observe Lent in the 21st century (and not all do significantly) use it as a time for prayer and penance. Only a small number of people today fast for the whole of Lent, although some maintain the practice on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday. It is more common these days for believers to surrender a particular vice such as favourite foods or smoking. Whatever the sacrifice it is a reflection of Jesus deprivation in the wilderness and a test of self-discipline.
 
Why 40 days?
40 is a significant number in Jewish-Christian scripture:
In Genesis, the flood which destroyed the earth was brought about by 40 days and nights of rain.
The Hebrews spent 40 years in the wilderness before reaching the land promised to them by God.
Moses fasted for 40 days before receiving the ten commandments on Mount Sinai.
Jesus spent 40 days fasting in the wilderness in preparation for his ministry.
Most Christians regard Jesus time in the wilderness as the key event for the duration of Lent.

Why is it called Lent?
Lent is an old English word meaning lengthen. Lent is observed in spring, when the days begin to get longer.
 
The colour purple
Purple is the symbolic colour used in some churches throughout Lent, for drapes and altar frontals. Purple is used for two reasons: firstly because it is associated with mourning and so anticipates the pain and suffering of the crucifixion, and secondly because purple is the colour associated with royalty, and celebrates Christs resurrection and sovereignty.
 
East and West
Both the eastern and western churches observe Lent but they count the 40 days differently. The western church excludes Sundays (which is celebrated as the day of Christs resurrection) whereas the eastern church includes them. The churches also start Lent on different days. Western churches start Lent on the 7th Wednesday before Easter Day (called Ash Wednesday). Eastern churches start Lent on the Monday of the 7th week before Easter and end it on the Friday 9 days before Easter. Eastern churches call this period the Great Lent. The last week of Lent is called Holy Week.


 
Matthew 4:1-11
  
Then Jesus was led by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil.  After fasting forty days and forty nights, he was hungry.  The tempter came to him and said, “If you are the Son of God, tell these stones to become bread.”
 
Jesus answered, “It is written: ‘Man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God.’”
 
Then the devil took him to the holy city and had him stand on the highest point of the temple.

“If you are the Son of God,” he said, “throw yourself down. For it is written: “‘He will command his angels concerning you, and they will lift you up in their hands, so that you will not strike your foot against a stone.’”
 
Jesus answered him, “It is also written: ‘Do not put the Lord your God to the test.’”
 
Again, the devil took him to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their splendour. “All this I will give you,” he said, “if you will bow down and worship me.”
 
Jesus said to him, “Away from me, Satan! For it is written: ‘Worship the Lord your God, and serve him only.’”
 
Then the devil left him, and angels came and attended him.



Traditionally the view seems to have been that we give up “something” for Lent. Almost like the idea of a Dry January. However the purpose of giving up an activity was to allow more time for prayer and spiritual practice. I think that the words of Pope Francis  point us in that direction urging us towards kindness, compassion, simplicity and so on. Similarly the “Love Yourself Through Lent Activities” not all of which are possible this year because of Covid restrictions but you could dance like nobody is watching, phone a friend and watch the clouds – oh and we could add Zoom Free Days [Malcolm]
 
Thoughts from the Congregation about Lent  
• This period in the year prompts us to take the time to look at our lifestyle to reflect on our priorities, our desires, our addictions, our attitudes, our behaviour, our approach and to take the time to reflect on these actions.  We then challenge ourselves to ask if we really need something, which we see as a necessity. We are greedy, we have a lack of thought for others and society in the world, we have so much – we have too much! 
• During this ”Lent” I have decided not to take so much for granted and pray for the healing and caring for “ Our World”, “Our Country”, all beauty and sounds around us that have been such a comfort in these strange times. I have so much to “Thank God” for. 
• Lent - For many years I struggled with Lent. I felt guilty as if I should be doing something because the Church told me it was a very important time in my relationship with God. I tended to ignore it. Now I am comfortable not doing anything different from my normal weekly activities with God. However, I would be glad to hear the thoughts of others as it may change my thinking.
 


Prayer of St Francis
 
Lord, make me an instrument of your peace.
Where there is hatred, let me bring love.
Where there is offence, let me bring pardon.
Where there is discord, let me bring union.
Where there is error, let me bring truth.
Where there is doubt, let me bring faith.
Where there is despair, let me bring hope.
Where there is darkness, let me bring your light.
Where there is sadness, let me bring joy.

O Master, let me not seek as much
to be consoled as to console,
to be understood as to understand,
to be loved as to love,
for it is in giving that one receives,
it is in self-forgetting that one finds,
it is in pardoning that one is pardoned,
it is in dying that one is raised to eternal life. 
Amen
 


Notes:
 [1]       Check this link for info re Brechin Community Led Tourism 
https://www.facebook.com/343486646842046/posts/343675253489852/?sfnsn=scwspwa.
 Should we be involved in this conversation?  Any volunteers to represent Gardner and Farnell??
 
[2]       The Gardner Memorial Kirk Session will meet by Zoom on Monday 22nd  Feb  at 7.30pm
 
[3]       There will be a Zoom  Meeting on Friday 26th  Feb  at 10.30am for a GM/F virtual coffee and chat.  The link details will be circulated on Thursday
 
 

May the road through life continue to rise to meet you
May the wind be at your back
May any rain that falls be soft and light.
May you be held by the love of God
In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
Amen

 

Malcolm
 
E:    malc.rooney@gmail.com           office@gardnermemorialbrechin.org.uk
M: 07909993233                                            01356 629191
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